make a donation to the fz1oa
fz1oa chat
fz1oa picture uploader
maintain your own photo albums
locate fz1oa members
Members Assistance Guide
search the entire board
click here for fz1oa web site home page
register a new account, it's free!
fz1oa store
email the fz1oa webmasters
read the fz1oa guidelines
read the fz1oa policy
open pat's fz1 site in a new window
open iowaz fz1 site in a new window
technical tips

Go Back   FZ1OA Message Board > FZ1 & Fazer Owners Association > Service & Maintenance > Gen 1 Service & Maintenance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-24-2008, 07:10 PM   #1
rich_in_orlando
They tortured in our name!
 
rich_in_orlando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Ocoee, FL
Posts: 686
Valve adjustment tips

I just did my first valve adjustment on my '04 today and it was a learning experience. The far left valve on cylinder 1 was just a little tight and the bike had been running poorly so I decided I had better do the deed.

I have a factory service manual but it wasn't as useful as I would have liked. So I am putting together this list to help myself and others the next time an actual adjustment is needed.

This list assumes that only the intake cam needs to come off. It's more work to do both but the concept is the same.

Tools needed:
5 mm allen wrench
8 mm socket
10 mm wrench
Small flat head screwdriver.
Air ratchet

Start by draining the coolant, then take off the coolant hoses from the pipes on the head and unplug the spark plug caps.

Next, take off the valve cover.

Remove the spark plugs

Take off the cap to access the bolt to turn the crankshaft. Turn the crankshaft clockwise so that piston 1 is at TDC. The punch mark on the exhaust cam should line up with the mark on the cam cap and both sets of cam lobes on cylinder #1 will be pointing away from each other. This will get your camshafts indexed to begin the procedure.

Now turn the crankshaft clockwise enough turns (maybe 270 degrees) to be able to remove the bolt on the intake cam sprocket. Take that bolt off.

Turn the crankshaft to get back to #1 TDC. The other bolt should be able to be accessed on the intake cam.

Take the cover off of the timing chain tensioner and use the small screwdriver to loosen the tensioner. Now remove the tensioner.

Remove the intake cam sprocket bolt and remove the sprocket. Use a wire to lock down the timing chain to the exhaust sprocket so it doesn't move and goof up the timing.

Take off the cam caps in stages using a criss-cross pattern. An air ratchet makes this job much easier. Now remove the camshaft.

At this point just follow the instructions in the manual for sizing the shims. Take the bucket off, remove the old shim and replace it with a new one. Be sure to seat the shim properly in the little space for it. Tap it with a plastic tool to make sure it's seated. Replace the bucket(s).

Reinstalling the camshaft:

The exhaust [sorry, I mistyped it the first time as intake] camshaft should still be lined up like before with the punch mark lined up in front of the index mark on the cam cap.

Put the intake camshaft in place with the punch mark facing up. Put the cam caps back on loosely.

Tighten the cam caps to the proper torque using a criss cross pattern, starting from the center and working out. The air ratchet rally helps here.

My cam sprockets had punch marks on them. The punch mark on the exhaust cam sprocket was visible when the camshaft was indexed properly. Count the number of cam chain pins between the punch marks on the exhaust and intake cam sprockets. When the intake camshaft is lined up properly, there should be 18 pins on the chain between the two punch marks. You will be able to tell they are lined up if the sprocket bolt goes in easily. You may have to rotate the intake camshaft ever so slightly to get the bolt holes to line up.

Put the bolt in the cam sprocket and tighten to proper specs.

Take the wire off of the exhaust cam sprocket that you used to keep it from slipping.

Put the cam chain tensioner back on and release the spring tensioner.

Now rotate the crankshaft clockwise to access the other bolt hole on the intake cam sprocket. Put the other bolt in and tighten to specs.

At this point, you should turn the crankshaft clockwise a bunch of turns and then get it back to #1 TDC. Check that the punch marks and the cam lobes are oriented properly to verify cam timing.

Now check your valve clearance to make sure it is now within specs.

If it is, put everything back together and ride.
__________________
'99 Yamaha WR400F, '04 Yamaha FZ1, '94 Honda XR650L
My_FZ1_Photo_Gallery Dixie Dual Sport

Last edited by rich_in_orlando; 06-04-2008 at 07:37 PM.
rich_in_orlando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2008, 09:40 PM   #2
MEAKN
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 18
Great write up. This should be a lot better than any manual.
MEAKN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2008, 10:08 PM   #3
jpgrfan
Resistance is futile!
 
jpgrfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Earth (Austin, TX)
Posts: 10,842
Before lifting the cover, you should shoot compressed air down the hole to blow any loose stuff out. Wiggle the nozzle while spraying air to get anything in there moving up and out. Otherwise it will fall into the head when you pull the cover. Don't ask me how I know this.

__________________
There is a fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."
Naked FZ1's can be a lot of fun. Bike Pics
Current bikes: '80 XT250, '81 TS250, '82 CBX, '97 ST1100, '04 FZ1 (skunk)
jpgrfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2008, 05:24 AM   #4
rich_in_orlando
They tortured in our name!
 
rich_in_orlando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Ocoee, FL
Posts: 686
There were big globs of dirt and other gunk residing around the coolant pipes that needed cleaning. If not careful, the dirt could find its way into the engine. Those pipe connections are open to the elements and can build up grime, as I found out. At first I was like .

I used a shop-vac and a toothbrush/dental pick to get the grime out before something bad happened.
__________________
'99 Yamaha WR400F, '04 Yamaha FZ1, '94 Honda XR650L
My_FZ1_Photo_Gallery Dixie Dual Sport
rich_in_orlando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2008, 05:32 AM   #5
rich_in_orlando
They tortured in our name!
 
rich_in_orlando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Ocoee, FL
Posts: 686
Another tip: NEVER try to rotate the crankshaft during this procedure for any reason without the cam chain tensioner in place and engaged. The chain will slip and the valve timing will be off. I found this out the hard way.

My only prior experience with shim under bucket valves is on my WR400. This procedure is different from my WR400 timing chain. You can rotate the crankshaft with the tensioner loose. I thought they would be the same so I got lazy and had to take the whole GD thing apart, including the exhaust camshaft when I tried to make fine adjustments in the cam position by rotating the crankshaft without the tensioner engaged.
__________________
'99 Yamaha WR400F, '04 Yamaha FZ1, '94 Honda XR650L
My_FZ1_Photo_Gallery Dixie Dual Sport
rich_in_orlando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 10:07 AM   #6
fzrider03
Registered User
 
fzrider03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wills Point, TX
Posts: 53
ok, I have a few questions.


why onty the intake cam? and not the exh cam?

how did you measure to find the right shim? or did you use feeler gauge first?

I am in bad need of adjustment and want to do it right the first time.

I have never done a shim and bucket style, but am mechanicallly sound
when doing this. I am a mech 13 yrs by trade.

did you buy a shim kit before starting? is this possible?

thanks for all the answers in advance.
fzrider03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2008, 07:09 PM   #7
rich_in_orlando
They tortured in our name!
 
rich_in_orlando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Ocoee, FL
Posts: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by fzrider03
ok, I have a few questions.


why onty the intake cam? and not the exh cam?

how did you measure to find the right shim? or did you use feeler gauge first?

I am in bad need of adjustment and want to do it right the first time.

I have never done a shim and bucket style, but am mechanicallly sound
when doing this. I am a mech 13 yrs by trade.

did you buy a shim kit before starting? is this possible?

thanks for all the answers in advance.

HHHmmm... where to begin...

In a shim under bucket system, the cam lobes actuate the valves by pushing down on the top of them. A cap (bucket) sits on top of the valve/spring assembly between the valve and cam lobe to provide a smooth surface for the cam to slide across and to protect both the valve and cam lobe. The valve clearance is set by using a small round pad ("shim") that rests on top of the valve stem, under the bucket.

Valve clearance is measured using a feeler gauge between the cam and the bucket. If the clearance is out of range, it is adjusted using a shim with a different thickness than is there at the time of the measurement. If the clearance is too loose, it calls for a thicker pad. Too tight, a thinner pad. There is a chart in the manual that tells you which new pad you need depending on a) the current measured clearance and b) the current pad. Intake specs call for a minimum of 0.11 mm. When I checked mine, the measured clearance was 0.102 mm. The valve used a 200 shim. The chart said I needed a 195 shim to get it to spec.

When I checked the clearance, only one valve on the intake side was a little tight. Thus, I didn't need to mess with the exhaust valves because they were within specs.

Shim kit? Unless you do this for a living, that's an expensive investment. These things are like 7-8 bucks each. A "shim kit" would cost hundreds at that rate and you may only need one or two. So you check the clearance, take out the shims that need replacing, read the size on them and check the chart to see what you need for replacement. Then head down to the dealer and get what you need. The bike may be down for a while if the dealer doesn't carry them in stock. Luckily, my dealer keeps these in stock.

BTW, how do you know the valves need adjusting on your bike? Many FZ owners never have to actually adjust the valves. They usually just check them to verify they are still in the proper clearance range.
__________________
'99 Yamaha WR400F, '04 Yamaha FZ1, '94 Honda XR650L
My_FZ1_Photo_Gallery Dixie Dual Sport
rich_in_orlando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 10:21 AM   #8
broke&poor
I have a belly button!
 
broke&poor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: orlando fl
Posts: 1,442
also previously posted elsewhere, it may be worthwhile to note that Honda shims are interchangeable with ours and come in thicknesses of 005 increments whereas the Yamaha shims are 010 increments
__________________
Buy it. Ride it. Mod it. Love it.
broke&poor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 11:37 AM   #9
fzrider03
Registered User
 
fzrider03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wills Point, TX
Posts: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rich_in_orlando
HHHmmm... where to begin...

In a shim under bucket system, the cam lobes actuate the valves by pushing down on the top of them. A cap (bucket) sits on top of the valve/spring assembly between the valve and cam lobe to provide a smooth surface for the cam to slide across and to protect both the valve and cam lobe. The valve clearance is set by using a small round pad ("shim") that rests on top of the valve stem, under the bucket.

Valve clearance is measured using a feeler gauge between the cam and the bucket. If the clearance is out of range, it is adjusted using a shim with a different thickness than is there at the time of the measurement. If the clearance is too loose, it calls for a thicker pad. Too tight, a thinner pad. There is a chart in the manual that tells you which new pad you need depending on a) the current measured clearance and b) the current pad. Intake specs call for a minimum of 0.11 mm. When I checked mine, the measured clearance was 0.102 mm. The valve used a 200 shim. The chart said I needed a 195 shim to get it to spec.

When I checked the clearance, only one valve on the intake side was a little tight. Thus, I didn't need to mess with the exhaust valves because they were within specs.

Shim kit? Unless you do this for a living, that's an expensive investment. These things are like 7-8 bucks each. A "shim kit" would cost hundreds at that rate and you may only need one or two. So you check the clearance, take out the shims that need replacing, read the size on them and check the chart to see what you need for replacement. Then head down to the dealer and get what you need. The bike may be down for a while if the dealer doesn't carry them in stock. Luckily, my dealer keeps these in stock.

BTW, how do you know the valves need adjusting on your bike? Many FZ owners never have to actually adjust the valves. They usually just check them to verify they are still in the proper clearance range.


Woops, sorry for making you type all of that. I meant to really ask how did
you measure the adjustments. I do understand the shim and bucket style
of followers.

I am saying that my bike needs an adjustment due to the fact of being over the 26k that the factory says to do it. The bike really doesnt run bad, however I dont want it to either.

I do know that its hard to start sometimes. Maybe mixture issue, I do have Ivans kit and have it set up the way he says to set it.

I do appreciate your help on this. thanks
fzrider03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 11:40 AM   #10
VA_rider
Registered User
 
VA_rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Staunton, VA
Posts: 7,683
GREAT writeup!!! now rip it all apart again and take pictures of the process...
__________________
Where else on your body can you get poop, wipe it with a piece of paper, and call it good?
VA_rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 06:15 PM   #11
NHFZ1
Marco Polo wanna be
 
NHFZ1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seacoast NH
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by fzrider03
I am saying that my bike needs an adjustment due to the fact of being over the 26k that the factory says to do it. The bike really doesnt run bad, however I dont want it to either.
I have checked the valve clearances twice on my bike. The first time at 29k miles and last weekend at 61k miles. I still haven't had to change any of the shims, everything is still within spec.
__________________
Sport touring....it's in our genes.
The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. A. Einstein
NHFZ1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 06:24 PM   #12
samotlietuvis
06 Yellow R1; 02 Red FZ1
 
samotlietuvis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Lancaster, CA
Posts: 1,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpgrfan
Before lifting the cover, you should shoot compressed air down the hole to blow any loose stuff out. Wiggle the nozzle while spraying air to get anything in there moving up and out. Otherwise it will fall into the head when you pull the cover. Don't ask me how I know this.

__________________
Tomas

02 FZ1 Custom Red aka fast couch (selling)
03 ZX6R Blue retired track machine (sold)
06 ZX6R silver current track machine (sold)
08 Corvette Z51 M6 VY (will be listed for sale shortly)
samotlietuvis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 06:25 PM   #13
samotlietuvis
06 Yellow R1; 02 Red FZ1
 
samotlietuvis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Lancaster, CA
Posts: 1,138
Shims can be reduced in thickness by 2/1000" by using fine sand paper, as long as you have time
__________________
Tomas

02 FZ1 Custom Red aka fast couch (selling)
03 ZX6R Blue retired track machine (sold)
06 ZX6R silver current track machine (sold)
08 Corvette Z51 M6 VY (will be listed for sale shortly)
samotlietuvis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 06:27 PM   #14
samotlietuvis
06 Yellow R1; 02 Red FZ1
 
samotlietuvis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Lancaster, CA
Posts: 1,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by fzrider03
ok, I have a few questions.


why onty the intake cam? and not the exh cam?

how did you measure to find the right shim? or did you use feeler gauge first?

I am in bad need of adjustment and want to do it right the first time.

I have never done a shim and bucket style, but am mechanicallly sound
when doing this. I am a mech 13 yrs by trade.

did you buy a shim kit before starting? is this possible?

thanks for all the answers in advance.
I bought entire shim kit for ~$50. The kit covers all the modern sports bikes.
__________________
Tomas

02 FZ1 Custom Red aka fast couch (selling)
03 ZX6R Blue retired track machine (sold)
06 ZX6R silver current track machine (sold)
08 Corvette Z51 M6 VY (will be listed for sale shortly)
samotlietuvis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 06:34 PM   #15
FUP
Naked
 
FUP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,334
Thanks Rich - I'm going to print this off and tuck it away for future reference.
FUP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 07:39 PM   #16
rich_in_orlando
They tortured in our name!
 
rich_in_orlando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Ocoee, FL
Posts: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by lietuvis1
I bought entire shim kit for ~$50. The kit covers all the modern sports bikes.
Well I'll be a monkey's uncle! I'll buy that for 50 bucks! Looks like I got ripped off. (Although I have a crapload of shims for my WR and they don't fit in the FZ.) Is there a particular kit you bought?
__________________
'99 Yamaha WR400F, '04 Yamaha FZ1, '94 Honda XR650L
My_FZ1_Photo_Gallery Dixie Dual Sport
rich_in_orlando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2008, 07:42 PM   #17
samotlietuvis
06 Yellow R1; 02 Red FZ1
 
samotlietuvis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Lancaster, CA
Posts: 1,138
Quote:
Originally Posted by rich_in_orlando
Well I'll be a monkey's uncle! I'll buy that for 50 bucks! Looks like I got ripped off. (Although I have a crapload of shims for my WR and they don't fit in the FZ.) Is there a particular kit you bought?

http://www.procycle-online.com/hotcams/valve_shims.htm
$80.

I got mine on e-bay for ~$50.
__________________
Tomas

02 FZ1 Custom Red aka fast couch (selling)
03 ZX6R Blue retired track machine (sold)
06 ZX6R silver current track machine (sold)
08 Corvette Z51 M6 VY (will be listed for sale shortly)
samotlietuvis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2008, 10:54 AM   #18
SUCATI
Bob Cratchet - Up on Sugarloaf
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 1,241
Rich,
I wish I had been around when you did that. I would have liked to have lurked during the cam removal time.

I checked all mine last year. I didn't find any that I wanted to adjust at that time. But next time........

Hope you had fun!

Mike
__________________
Current inventory: '01 FZ1
SUCATI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 08:14 AM   #19
Lammy1000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Northeast NY
Posts: 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHFZ1
I have checked the valve clearances twice on my bike. The first time at 29k miles and last weekend at 61k miles. I still haven't had to change any of the shims, everything is still within spec.
Wow, I hope to have this kind of luck. Honestly, I don't ride that hard and would probibly be considered a pu**sy by alot of the fast riders on this site...more of a sport touring style. Do you think your riding habits had much to do with your valves staying in spec?
Lammy1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 08:14 AM   #20
Lammy1000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Northeast NY
Posts: 239
123
Lammy1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   FZ1OA Message Board > FZ1 & Fazer Owners Association > Service & Maintenance > Gen 1 Service & Maintenance


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:03 AM.


Questions? Comments?
Click on name below to contact via PM
wArDoG (Prez, Treasurer, Web Site & Admin) Rabeet (Admin)
firstfz (Web Site & Admin) Desmo (Admin)
RoadRashed (Admin) dipps (Admin)
Black Mantis (Moderator) pogden (Moderator)

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Website and Message Board Contents Copyright 2001-2007 FZ1OA
The marks YAMAHA® and FZ1® are used under license from Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A.
The information on this web site is NOT approved or endorsed by Yamaha Motor Corporation in any way.
Page generated in 0.24574 seconds with 9 queries