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Old 07-26-2018, 05:39 AM   #61
grommet
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I'll be starting a thread for Arkansas in September soon . . .

Another video. Includes the last one, with photos and more video from the rest of the trip.

I didn't get a lot of video on my bike this trip, but there is some near the end.

I'll post the pics here as well with some more commentary about what's going on.

https://youtu.be/PDr2W-7ZMXs

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Old 07-26-2018, 07:24 AM   #62
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Ah, Walden CO. I like wringing the FZ1 out south of there.

Sounds like a fantastic trip!
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Old 07-29-2018, 08:11 AM   #63
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I read these comments by a Revzilla reviewer on the SDR, while reviewing the SA-S and comparing them. Sound familiar? "Based on my experience with the SDR last summer, sixth gear was almost unusable, bogging down unless you were going 90 mph."

The SA-S was more usable in 6th.
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Old 07-29-2018, 09:20 AM   #64
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I have 1 tooth down on the front sprocket, so 6th gear is useful from 80mph up.

On this trip, I spent a lot of time in the 85-100mph range, so I used it quite a bit.
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Old 07-29-2018, 02:38 PM   #65
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What an awesome trip Patrick!!!

I sure hope to make it up to the true "North" some day.
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Old 07-30-2018, 12:18 AM   #66
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Now back to the pics:

The day after sailing, we went south down the peninsula to Chilkat State Park. It was cloudy and cool, in the mid to high 50s.

Looking south down the Chilkat River. Or actually, where the river joins the Lynn Canal.





The mountains to the west. That's a glacier up on top.





There are mostly igneous rocks around here, so although there is not much sand on the beaches, what is there is black:










Me and Heather:





Sam and Natalie:




A closer look at that glacier:



That day we also stopped in at the local salmon cannery, The Haines Packing Company. It's a pretty small operation, with the entire disassembly and cleaning area in an area about 30' X 15'. The header was running about 1 cut per 3-4 seconds, much slower than the one at the cannery I worked in back in college, which was going at least once per second, or maybe even faster. They have it set up so you can do a tour of the entire line, with big windows along one side of the operation area. It was kind of cool to be able to see it working, and even better to know that I did not have to go inside and work there for 16 hours a day like the last time I visited a cannery

Next day we went way up the Chilkat River, to Klukwan. There is a native heritage center there, a museum where they have guided tours with information all about the native Tlinget people. They don't allow any photos, so we didn't take any. We also spent an hour or so down at the river. More eagles, and some fresh bear tracks. Don't follow the game trails into the woods.

The day after that, it was fishing time. Not with fishing rods, but crab pots and a halibut skate. Sam has a fishing skiff. It's a 22' open boat with a 90hp outboard. Max speed of about 25mph. It's a rough, dirty, noisy boat, with a very rusty smaller Honda engine up front to work the crane.

The crab pots are basically round cages covered with chicken wire. There are holes in the sides with spring-loaded gates. The crab can go into the gates, but then they spring shut so they can't go back out. There is a bait pouch filled with small fish and chunks of larger fish. Each pot has some line and a buoy attached to it. They are just dumped over the side of the boat, in an area that's less deep than the length of the buoy line. We put 3 of them in fairly shallow water, and one, for kings, in around 200' of water.

The skiff:






On the water:







Pots:





A halibut skate is a long line with an anchor and buoy at each end, and 60 baited hooks along the line. We dropped it on a slope that wen from about 140' to 90' depth. The hooks are 6-8' apart. The idea is that the halibut are bottom feeders, so putting the line along the bottom will put all the bait and hooks in their normal feeding area. The hooks are all pre-baited and have a leader about 2' long, then a clip thing which makes it easy to attach and remove from the skate line.

There are lots of people putting crab pots and halibut lines in these waters. There are all sorts of rules about who can do what, and when and where they can do it. Heather and I could go along in the boat, but were technically not allowed to help with anything, or even touch the pots or lines or any of the equipment used for fishing. Other tricky things about it - don't put your pots in the same area as any commercial guys. They are very territorial and will come by and cut your lines. When that happens, the buoy drifts off and the line and crab pot sink to the bottom and are lost. I suspect they also come along and harvest from other peoples' pots, but Sam said that would be a serious infraction and probably doesn't happen. But you leave it out there for a day or two and there's really nobody watching.

Interesting system.

So we put everything out, and boated around a bit more that afternoon. It was nice out, seas were quiet, and the wind was down. Lots of fun.

Next day we went out to retrieve everything. I was just watching:






This is the king pot. There are a bunch in there, but most are females, so they go back in the water.



Most of them are dungeness, but this is a blue king:



Also female, so it lives another day. We ended up with only one male to take home. It was cooked a couple hours later, and was very tasty.



The skate did not bring in any halibut. It did catch a bunch of these really ugly fish, the name of which I don't remember:




These are the hooks that go on the skate:




None of us got seasick and Heather and I both felt like we learned some new life skills, though fishing is a tough and stinky way to make a living.
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Old 07-30-2018, 01:31 AM   #67
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The way home:

As luck would have it, we needed to get the oil on the car changed mid-trip. While in Haines, we called the Toyota dealerships along the way and made and appointment for Friday at 11:00 with the one in Prince George. Google maps put it at 25 hours from Haines. We planned to leave at 4am Thursday morning, leaving us at least 6 hours extra for the trip to PG. We pulled out at 4:12, drove almost an hour up the road to the border crossing, and found that it didn't open till 8am. Oops. Natalie and Sam forgot to mention that. So we napped for a couple of hours, and got through without incident.

The weather was nice all the way through Whitehorse and over to the Cassiar. Also nice going south on the Cassiar, so I got the bike down and rode from about 50 miles north of Dease Lake. I started out at a normal pace but the way the highway is, soon found myself at the same 80-100 mph pace that was comfortable going north on the way up. Of course there were places I slowed down. There are many gravel sections along there, and none of them have much warning at all.

My plan was to ride down to Meziadin Junction. As luck would have it, the temperature dropped into the 40s and it started to rain about 20 miles north of Bell 2 Lodge, so I pulled out there and waited for Heather to catch up. Good decision - it rained from there, all through the night and most of the way into Prince George the next morning. I did get a few pics from along the Cassiar:

Dease River bridge:




Rainbows:




Sunset:






Somewhere along in there, as I was checking the straps on the trailer, I noticed the rear straps were suddenly much looser than they should be. I looked closer and found that the main rail of the trailer was cracked from top to bottom on one side, so only one side of the rail was keeping it up. And it was slowly bending, allowing the horizontal part of the rail to sag downward. It would not be good for that rail to let go at speed with my bike on it. So while we were getting the oil changed on the car, I called around and found a welding shop that could get us in that afternoon for a repair. Nechako Steel. They did a great job, putting a new, much stronger, rail inside the original one. About an hour and $150 Canadian ($112 US) later, we were on our way again. I thought it was a bargain, as just the material would have cost me nearly that here in Wichita.

The back lot at Nechako Steel:






Next issue: While in the lot at the steel place, the guy who was helping us noticed my bike was leaking gas. Front vent tube fitting, lower left front of the tank. It had leaked once before, and I put an o-ring under the threaded fitting. That o-ring must have failed, or the fitting loosened up, or something. I wasn't sure what to do, so we left and I thought about it for a while. Headed south on 97, hoping to be able to ride BC hwy 3 the next day.

Options to fix the gas leak:

Option 1: do nothing, hope the leaking gas does not lead to a pyrotechnic display.

Option 2: Glue the snot out of the area around the fitting with black RTV or something.

Option 3. Remove the fitting, and replace it with a screw, large flat washer, and some new o-rings.

Option 4: put a new o-ring under the head of the existing fitting.

Analysis: Option 1 was a bad idea. Don't really want the Katoom to go Kaboom. Option 2 would probably fail due to hydraulic pressure behind the glue. Option 3 would be difficult and probably wouldn't work because of the joint between the screw and the washer. Option 4 seemed best. I looked ahead on the map and found what seemed like a good auto parts store in Williams Lake. Turns out it's actually the best-stocked and most complete auto parts store I've even been in. They have everything. I got JBWeld, Black RTV, and some o-rings (I guessed on the sizes). I also drained all the gas out of the tank, so it would stop leaking as we went down the road.

We had planned to make it to Oliver that night. The trip down the Sea-to-Sky highway to Vancouver was not possible in the time/distance we had to work with. I found an airbnb there for a reasonable price - an RV in the owner's driveway. It was a nice place to stay for about $60.

On the way there were a bunch of forest fires in the area between Peachland and Penticton. Traffic was a bit slow but moving right along, and there were fires sometimes just a few feet off the road. It was hard to tell if anyone was actively fighting the fire, but in some places it was being left alone to burn out.

Getting close to Oliver, we saw signs for cherry orchards, so we decided to sleep in in the morning, then go pick cherries before heading east on BC 3. That was a fine idea. We went to Hillside Orchards, on 97 between Oliver and Osoyoos.













We got a load of cherries, which we snacked on all the way home. There are still two bins of them in the fridge, and they are wonderful. Worth it for a trip up there just for those.

After the cherries, we stopped at a city park in Osoyoos, and I worked on the gas leak. Turned out that option 4 worked. The new o-rings I got were thinner than the previous ones I'd put in there, so I was able to tighten the fitting one full turn more than before. It did the trick. No leaks and still doing fine.

Suited up and off we went, east on BC 3. Beautiful ride up a winding set of fast switchbacks, then many miles of the good stuff.



Heather and the 1-bike trailer going by:



More good stuff:



We went east to Creston, then dropped down through the Porthill border station, then down toward Libby, MT. Along the Kootenai River on US 2, west of Libby:




The day's riding ended at the McDonalds in Libby. Double Quarter Pounder, no cheese, extra onions, chicken tenders with buffalo sauce. Yum.



Long way to go from there. Drove through the night another 580 miles to Alpine, Wyoming. Along the way we stopped in Missoula and saw this redneck special:



Just after I took the picture, a couple of guys drove up and commented that they had seen me take the picture, and it was their friend's truck. Said it had some serious crazy stuff going on with the driveline. Looked like an inverted transfer case was used to drop a shaft to the middle wheels. Yep, that's nuts. They said they doubted it could go much more than 45 mph.

Crazy.


Next day I rode up the Snake River Valley from Alpine, WY, to US 191 (one of my favorite roads) and down to Daniel Junction. A very fun, fast ride. 80-90mph the whole way. I did see a cop in there but he was not broadcasting so no worries.

While passing a car in that stretch, I noticed a bit of power loss at full throttle in 5th gear. Didn't think much of it, but should have taken note.

Loaded up in Daniel, and we drove down to I-80. East on I-80 to WY 789, where I got the bike off again. Plan was to ride south to Baggs, east to Riverside and down to Walden, then south on 125 to Granby and east over the mountains through Estes Park to Loveland, where I'd meet up with Heather and drive the rest of the way home. Was not to be. All was ok until about halfway between Baggs and Riverside, the bike lost all power above half throttle. This got worse and worse until it would barely run with almost no throttle, then sputtered out completely. I waited a few minutes, tried to restart, and it came back to life. Rode onward, over a mountain pass, gradually the problem came back. At this point it would run with less than 1/4 throttle, then after 10 minutes or so die. Then start right up, run great for a bit, then falters again to stoppage. I think and think, and conclude it's a clogged vent line creating a vacuum lock in the tank, so I disconnect the vent at the lower left rear of the tank. That helped a bit, but only by delaying the decay to stoppage a bit longer. OK, I reason, maybe the vent line inside the tank (not sure how this is done in there) has come loose or stopped up inside, so I open the gas cap and just let it sit against the latch. Some improvement. Now I can ride slowly, barely using any throttle, but as soon as more than 1/4 is applied, bogging results and power is gone. I change course in Walden, let Heather know, limped it over the mountain and most of the way down to Fort Collins, where she met me. No real big problem, but the fun factor was way down for the last few miles of riding.



I did get a few fun on this last riding bit.

All these tractors were on the road east of Riverside. About 20 of them. Must have been going to some kind of meet-up




Top of the mountain between Baggs and Riverside:



A long and winding road:




Cache La Poudre River, west of Fort Collins, where Heather picked me up:




All in all a very fun trip. If you've never ridden or driven to Alaska, you should do it. Totally, 1000% worth it.
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Old 07-30-2018, 01:32 AM   #68
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By the way, further research revealed a fairly common problem with an overzealous prefilter on the KTM fuel system.

Fixed and running fine now.
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:47 AM   #69
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Great stuff Patrick!
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Old 07-30-2018, 08:14 PM   #70
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What a fabulous trip, stunning scenery. Living the Alaska life looks tough but rewarding. I think rockfish or lincod? makes good dog protein and lamp oil, probably fuel a KTM on it. All that work and one crab ? I'm fishing at Kroger.
Man can conquer with a Heather hanging around, I hope she enjoyed the journey too. Most likely the cause of any rainbows also.

Cherries have this awesome dietary property that kills inflamation, arthritis symptoms and fatigued muscles. Recently discovered, eat more cherries.
McDonalds cheese is petroleum based and can be used for O rings and gaskets in emergencies. Don't eat it.

Thanks for sharing, that rear tire looks to still be squared off.
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Old 07-30-2018, 08:32 PM   #71
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I don't think I've eaten at Mickey Deez during this millennium.

Fantastic trip.
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Old 08-09-2018, 03:08 PM   #72
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A little note from my recent trip.

We stopped at Tatogga Lake Lodge on the way up. Met the guy who runs it. He was helpful. Let us use the wifi. Let me use the water hose to clean all the dust from my bike. He told me about how his prices to stay at the lodge are much cheaper than Bell 2. The truck guys eating breakfast there said the food was good.

So far, so good. All pretty much what you'd expect.

My wife commented that he seemed a bit off. I said nah, that's just his way. Didn't think more of it.

On the way back, we stopped in there again. Got gas, used wifi again. I asked if I could fill up the water bladder in my tank bag in the kitchen. He said sure. We were talking about this and that while I gassed up and was getting the water. He asked about my bike, where it was made. I said it was made in Austria. All of a sudden, he goes into this rant about how the world owes the Austrians and the Germans a big debt.

"Oh, how so?" I asked.

"Well, they saved Europe from the Red Army, which was on the brink of invading and taking over the continent."

"Really." I said.

"Yes. And everything we've been told about WW2 is all lies, told by 'those people' so that they could control us."

At which point I was done getting the water and walked away, got on my bike, and left.

I'm not Jewish. I have some German and Irish blood. Don't claim a stake on either side of that conflict, other than being glad we won and the ambitions of a madman were stopped. But I have uncles who fought in the war, and I know it was not all lies. Sad to find out this guy who runs a cool outfit in a beautiful part of BC is a rabid Jew hater and holocaust denier.

Weird, the stuff you run into on the road.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:57 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet View Post

Weird, the stuff you run into on the road.
I have run into some weird stuff, but fortunately nothing like that. Nice trip Patrick! Thanks for sharing your experiences and photos.
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Old 08-09-2018, 08:53 PM   #74
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Perhaps the shop owner missed some History Channel episodes or skipped the Stalin-Churchill chapters. Not a place for long talks, the road calls...

3 friends just did BC and a nice train tour, I need to also.
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